Highlights

All Out is bringing people power to the global movement for love and equality. We petition world leaders and global organisations while using creative tactics – online and offline – to advance the fight for the rights of lesbian, gay, bi and trans people. See below for some of our campaign highlights.

Religion isn’t an excuse to discriminate!
#FreeTheFive: Freeing The Five in China
Supporting equality in Paraguay
Going All Out during the Sochi Olympics
Taking on gay ‘cures’ worldwide
Taking on Uganda’s worst anti-gay tabloid
Blocking a transphobic bathroom bill
“Marriage For All” in France
Defunding hate on CVN
Bringing together Brazil’s Equality Moms
Crowdfunding for Iraq
Ending forced sterilisation in Sweden
Shelving Uganda’s anti-gay bill
TV9’s anti-gay “exposé”



Religion isn’t an excuse to discriminate!

August 2015

Love has won and marriage equality is now legal in all US states. But one Ohio judge refused to marry gay and lesbian couples: he asked for permission to use religion as an excuse for discrimination.

10,000 All Out members signed a petition and asked the Supreme Court judges in Ohio to make sure all public servants in Ohio abide by the law and uphold marriage equality. And we won! The Supreme Court’s Board of Professional Conduct announced that judges may not refuse to perform same-sex marriages.



Freeing The Five in China

April 2015

When 5 LGBT and women’s rights activists were arrested in China, All Out members were quick to spread the word. They were being held with little explanation in detention after staging a stickering protest against sexual harassment, and could face up to 5 years in prison. One of the women had helped partner on an All Out campaign months before.

After 120,000 people signed the global petition and shared, all 5 women were released from jail!



Supporting equality in Paraguay

June 2014

Gay, lesbian and trans people face constant violence in South America. Earlier this year, the Organization of American States (OAS) was finally considering a declaration that would protect gay, lesbian, bi and trans people from violence and discrimination. But Paraguay announced it would vote against it.

7,000 All Out members signed an urgent petition. Our partners in Paraguay, SOMOSGAY, organized a street protest and we caught a lot of media attention. We delivered our signatures just before the vote – and won! The President then announced he would vote in favor of equality.



Going All Out during the Sochi Olympics

April 2014

The anti-gay laws passed in Russia resulted in a rise in violence against lesbian, gay, bi and trans people: our friends were being attacked in the street and facing persecution everywhere. The Sochi Olympic Games provided an opportunity for All Out members to mobilise. Over 1 million people took action worldwide, alongside over 13,000 Russian members. Here are some of our victories:

  • More than 50 All Out members delivered a petition of 300,000 names to the International Olympic Committee (IOC). For the first time in its history, the IOC publicly stated that Principle 6 in the Olympic charter prohibits discrimination based on sexual orientation.
  • To take the message offline, All Out members and supporters worldwide showed support by buying Principle 6 gear created by American Apparel. Celebrities like Rihanna, Mark Ruffalo, and Zachary Quinto wore P6 gear and shared about it on social media. We also got 50 Olympic champions to join our campaign. Love and equality became the name of the game.
  • More than 150,000 All Out members emailed Coca-Cola’s CEO urging the company to denounce Russia’s anti-gay laws. We also crowdfunded massive billboards on wheels to swarm Coca-Cola HQ with our message. We whipped up a media storm, and three National Olympic sponsors publicly denounced the anti-gay laws.
  • The language of our campaigns was used in major media outlets and was even adopted by leaders like UK Prime Minister David Cameron and UN Secretary General Ban Ki-Moon during his opening remarks at the Sochi Olympics.

We made sure Russia knew the world was watching – and put love and equality at the center of the global conversation.



Taking on gay ‘cures’ worldwide

Ongoing

We know you can’t catch “gay”, and you can’t cure it either – but around the world, extremist groups have promoted dangerous “therapy” sessions and seminars to “fix” people for who they love. All Out members across the globe called on Health Ministers to speak out against gay “cures”. They lead the charge to successfully push back against fraudulent therapies that were promoted as a legitimate medical treatment.

Our campaign to stop gay ‘cure’ sessions worldwide has sparked a global outcry. The Ecuadorian government agreed to shut down over 200 clinics promoting ‘conversion therapy’, while the French Health Minister publicly condemned such ‘treatments’. In Argentina, a scheduled ‘cure’ session was shut down after our campaign made national news. In China, more than 100,000 of us supported Xiao Zhen, a young man who was suing a clinic that had tried to ‘cure’ him from being gay, in getting the World Health Organisation to speak out against these anti-gay ‘treatments’.



Taking on Uganda’s worst anti-gay tabloid

March 2013

One of the world’s largest telecommunications companies, Orange, was caught advertising on the website of a major Ugandan tabloid known for leading an anti-gay witch-hunt in the country.

More than 85,000 All Out members took action, signing a petition and tweeting at Orange, asking them to immediately pull the ads. In response, Orange confirmed they would sever ties with the tabloid. The company also promised to protect their lesbian, gay, bi and trans employees in Uganda.



Blocking a transphobic bathroom bill

March 2013

All Out members helped stopped a proposed bill in the US state of Arizona that would jail people for using bathrooms that do not match the gender indicated on their birth certificates.

We worked with activists in Arizona as well as the National Center for Transgender Equality to halt a second bill to make it illegal for cities to pass protections or individuals on the basis of gender identity or expression from facing discrimination in or being barred from public restrooms. The representative who proposed the two bills ultimately withdrew both.



“Marriage For All” in France

January 2013

Before the historic vote for marriage equality in France, anti-equality voices were growing. Though more than 60% of French people were in support, anti-gay groups were organising – big and loud. In response, All Out members organised stunts in 16 French cities to support equality, reaching 4 million people on social media. They also funded a pro-equality ad in Le Monde, France’s largest newspaper, building critical momentum for the passage of marriage equality in the French legislature.

The law was adopted and then signed on May 18th, 2013. All Out was a special guest at Bruno and Vincent’s wedding – the first ever wedding of a French gay couple. Vive l’amour!



Defunding hate on CVN

August 2012

CVN, a website that set up portions of purchases to be donated to faith-based organisations, was working with some of the biggest brand names around: Westin Hotels, Avis and Expedia car rentals and Hotels.com. The problem? Some of those groups were anti-gay hate groups according to the Southern Poverty Law Center, fighting against marriage equality and even praying for the continued criminalisation of gay people worldwide.

All Out knocked companies off the CVN list one by one, taking creative strategies straight to the corporate source. Members shared a parody of Westin’s latest ad campaign on their Facebook wall, and then posted thousands of custom messages on the rest. Within 3 hours, Westin responded and stopped funding hate through CVN. Over the next 48 hours, Avis, Expedia and Hotels.com also dropped off the list and explicitly endorsed the rights of all people, regardless of who they are and who they love.



Bringing together Brazil’s Equality Moms

April 2012

When a prominent Brazilian congressman told the press that he’d “prefer a dead son to a gay son”, All Out brought together a group of amazing moms of LGBT people in Brazil, to share their stories and remind the country that LOVE is a family value.

The Equality Moms reclaimed public space using a display of large-scale photos exhibited in plazas in Rio, São Paulo, and other Brazilian cities. They also took their campaign to Brazil’s National Congress in Brasília, where they participated in a panel about equal rights. The Moms have generated pro-LGBT press and public conversation in broadcast, online, and print outlets, provoking a more positive discussion about LGBT life in Brazil.



Crowdfunding for Iraq

April 2012

“Kill lists” were used by militia to track down and murder people suspected of being gay in Iraq. All Out members donated $60,000 in just three days to evacuate those at most risk.

Thirteen people in immediate danger were safely resettled and started new lives. The Dutch government observed the operation and changed their refugee policy to ensure that they can respond to similar circumstances from now on.



Ending forced sterilisation in Sweden

January 2012

To legally change one’s gender in Sweden, the government forced all trans people to undergo sterilisation – with no option to freeze genetic material. In coordination with local groups and politicians, All Out launched the first public campaign to knock the law off the books.

Our petition was signed by more than 70,000 people which helped spur international media attention about the issue. The bill was repealed – and trans people are no longer forced to be sterilised in Sweden!



Shelving Uganda’s anti-gay bill

March 2011

When Uganda’s Parliament introduced a bill that punished gays and lesbians with the death penalty, All Out members jumped to action and spread a petition worldwide. To date, more than 240,000 people have added their name. Global leaders spoke out against the bill, including US President Obama and UK Prime Minister David Cameron.

The bill was stalled in the Parliament, but was passed later with the death penalty removed. In August 2014, Uganda’s constitutional court overturned the law, saying it was passed in parliament in December without the necessary number of legislators. All Out continues to work closely with partners on the ground to support the brave work of Ugandan LGBT groups.



TV9’s anti-gay “exposé”

February 2011

A report on TV9, a major Indian news network, shocked the world when it carried out a sting operation on gay men via online dating sites. TV9 journalists tracked down names, photos, sexual preference and even professions of men described as “”slaves to an unnatural lifestyle””, putting the entire LGBT community in danger.

All Out brought the community’s outrage to action, mobilising over a thousand people in India to write directly to TV9 CEO Ravi Prakesh demanding a public apology. After tremendous pressure, protests and a legal complaint by the victims themselves, TV9 was forced to pay 1,000,000 rupees and air 3 primetime public apologies. Needless to say, TV9 and all Indian media outlets will think twice about targeting LGBT people like this again.